Local Search & “I-Want-to-Go” Micro-Moments

Local Search & “I-Want-to-Go” Micro-Moments

Your shoes are talking. It’s high time to get a fresh pair. So, you whip out your phone, and search for “shoe stores near me”. You see a results page with a map showing 3 shoe stores just down the street. Out the door you go. Micro-Moments That’s a micro-moment, according to Google; and a micro-moment involving “near me” or “nearby” or “closest” is what Google calls an “I-want-to-go” micro-moment. These micro-moments are episodes wherein we want to get information (and get it quickly), so that we can take action. From Searcher to Customer Search queries involving “near me” show a lot of intent. According to a study conducted by Google and Ipsos, 50% of consumers who conduct a local search on their smartphone visit a store within a day, and 18% of those searches lead to a purchase within a day. That data shows the serious intent behind a “near me” search. When someone searches for “shoe store near me”, “laundromat near me”, or “pizza near me”, they mean business. And that’s precisely why your local search game needs to be in tip-top condition. Size Doesn’t Matter In reference to “I-want-to-go” micro-moments, Google argues that “[w]hether you’re a small business or global brand, you need to deliver on needs in these moments. You can build upon these moments using beacons, too; but, we’ll leave that topic on the table for now. And to whet your beacon appetite, a lost puppy gets found with a beacon and a phone!...
Local Search Listings Change to a 3-Pack Style on the Desktop

Local Search Listings Change to a 3-Pack Style on the Desktop

It’s evident that Google wants the desktop search experience to align with the mobile search experience. This strategy is readily apparent in Google’s newest change: moving from a 7-pack listing to a 3-pack listing in local search results on the desktop. The 3-Pack The “pack” style lists local businesses in a box, with the option of clicking on the map, website or directions. Here’s what a 3-pack looks like:   The old 7-pack style is simply an extension of the 3-pack, listing 7 businesses instead of 3. Why did Google make this change? The 3-packs fit exactly on a mobile phone screen. Since Google is emphasizing mobility these days, it makes sense that they would bring the desktop version in line with the mobile version. There are also questions of whether sites in positions 4-7 in the 7-pack received much traffic. If these lower positions got significantly fewer clicks, then Google possibly figured “What’s the sense in showing them?” However, these lower listings were a branding opportunity for businesses on the desktop. Now if local businesses have more than 2 competitors, they’ll need to work harder to capture the attention of searchers. What does this change mean for my website? If your business remains in the 3-pack, that’s good news, but it’s not a reason to rest on your laurels. Google continues to tweak Local Search factors and changes on their end could mean that you’re no longer in the sought-after box. Additionally, your competitors have probably figured out this new reality and are optimizing their web pages to bump you out of the coveted 3-pack. If your business...
The New Look of Google SERPs: Google Doesn’t Want Me to Leave

The New Look of Google SERPs: Google Doesn’t Want Me to Leave

As a couple of members of the webShine crew will be at SES San Francisco in September, we have been searching the web for deals on flights from Aspen to San Francisco. Though, during our search, we paid more attention to the updates to the search engine results pages (SERPs) that Google has been rolling out throughout the summer than flights, hotels, and restaurants. Case in point. Check out the Google SERP that came up after searching for “flights from aspen to san francisco”. Rather than using Google as a portal to popular booking sites like Expedia or Orbitz, Google has established its dominance in the SERPs by placing a Google flights search module at the top of the page, just under the paid search listings and just above the organic results. When searching for “hotels in san francisco”, I came across a similar situation where Google placed their information on nightly rates and reviews about San Francisco hotels just below the paid search field and just above the organic search results. In addition to the paid and organic areas on a SERP, there is now a new area for Google sponsored search results. Another addition to the Google SERP is the image carousel, whose presence at the is a bit more attention grabbing. As shown in the screen shots below, Google’s image carousel shows an images of hotels and restaurants, reviews, price range, and more. Google’s image carousel incorporates images, customer reviews, and other useful information into a SERP. With the localization and integration of information about a restaurant or hotel onto the Google SERP, web users now...

How It All Works Together: SEO, PPC, Social Media, Web Development, PR

Years ago search engine marketing was a relatively stand alone form of internet marketing. As the search engine algorithms have become more sophisticated and search engine marketers more well versed, the nature of search marketing has changed dramatically. It necessitates collaboration and action across multiple channels. Through webShine’s custom search engine marketing campaigns we establish where in the sea of internet marketing we need to partner with a company to increase traffic from Google, Yahoo, and Bing. The answer is never quite the same as each business is unique. As part of the needs assessment, it is critical for all to understand how the different pieces of the puzzle fit together. We find that infographics help to simplify and clarify. Note that the infographic here is intentionally oversimplified and is missing applicable pieces such as email marketing. Nonetheless, we find it helpful in explaining what we do in an effort to share with a prospect how we can help build their business. View infographic in full screen....
Local Search Seminar in Aspen, Carbondale, and Denver

Local Search Seminar in Aspen, Carbondale, and Denver

In recent years, local search has become a critical marketing initiative for businesses with a local presence. From a plumber who services a geographic area, to restaurant owners with multiple locations within a city or state, and everywhere in between, local search engine marketing is an effective tool for driving new sales and increasing revenue. As residents of the Roaring Fork Valley, webShine’s owners, Lindsay Reither and Lori Calcott, have noticed that many local businesses aren’t making the most out of local search. Google My Business Pages are unclaimed, Yelp listings are inaccurate, and more. Ultimately, it makes it harder for potential customers to call a business or find it on a map. Join webShine for a ½ day training session about local search. We’ll cover the basics quickly, jump into hands on tasks such as claiming listings and updating critical elements of information, and finish with advanced local search marketing tactics. At the end of the day, you’ll feel confident that customers can find your business online from their mobile phones or computers. Learn more about local search with...