Introducing Expanded Text Ads

Introducing Expanded Text Ads

Last month Google released a new ad format—expanded text ads. And, it’s kinda a big deal. Why? Expanded text ads include over 50% more characters than their old, standard ad format. Take a look at the before and after. Before In the standard ad format the headline was limited to 25 characters and the ad text was limited to 70 characters with 35 characters in one line and 35 characters in the second line. If your ad text didn’t divide perfectly between lines, well, sorry Charlie. After Introducing expanded text ads… The new and improved ad format allows for 30 characters in the headline, plus a second headline with another 30 characters and a full 80 characters for a description, with no line division. In addition, the display URL is designed to hold another 30 characters via two new “path fields” to help users understand where the ad will take them. The logic? Mobile. Google is definitely pushing “mobile-first”, and this update is geared toward providing catching headlines on mobile devices. From Google: Our research shows longer ad headlines are more useful to mobile users because they provide additional information about your business before they click your ad. No longer do we need to duplicate ads for mobile devices; the new format is mobile-optimized, and ads are automatically formatted for mobile devices. Here at webShine we have been working hard to implement ads in the new format for all our clients, and look forward to seeing the data (aka: improved click-through-rates!) in the coming...
webShine Goes to Google!

webShine Goes to Google!

We are excited to announce that webShine was selected to participate in the 5th annual Google All-Stars Summit. As a selected agency in this program, we won a one-day trip the Google Headquarters in San Jose, California. Although the trip was short, Google kept us busy. The day was filled with a variety of speakers focusing on optimization techniques, products updates, marketing theory and Google innovation philosophy. Of course, a trip to Google would not be complete without a tour of their amazing campus which includes everything from lap pools, hair salons and volleyball courts (they’re just missing a ski resort.) In true Google-style, they treated us to a party, complete with an adult bouncy house and local wine tasting. Here are some of our favorite take aways: We are in the “Participation Age” and are consumers are our best content creators. Engagement is extremely valuable. Aim to create content that is able to educate, entertain and inspire. Moments marketing allows you to take advantage of micro-moments. Searches that include phrases such as “near me” and “near by” have doubled over the past year. Identifying your customers micro-moments then ensure you are there when they are searching. Google’s 10X Innovation: Google believes that innovation can come from anywhere and encourage their employees to not only think out of the box but think big. Google is committed to improving their Partners Program and webShine will continue to be an active member.  The All-Stars competition is on-going and our goal is earn enough new clients to participate in the summit again next...
10 Reasons You Should Be Bidding on Your Brand

10 Reasons You Should Be Bidding on Your Brand

Most businesses are able to secure the top organic position for the brand, so why would you even think about paying for a click that might otherwise be free? Here are 10 reasons why we think bidding on your brand is smart search marketing. 1. The clicks are generally cheap. In paid search the more relevancy between the search query, the ad and the site, the higher the quality score and the lower the cost. It doesn’t get more relevant than bidding on your our name. 2. SERP Real Estate. The more space you can dominate the better. Less room for competitors, less chances for distraction. It’s your space – own it! 3. Craft a message about your brand that complements your organic listing. The page title on your homepage is an important piece of data for the search engines and needs to be carefully selected and written. A paid ad for your brand gives you more flexibility and a chance to say a little more. 4. Promote specials. Create specific campaigns with start and end dates related to specials and promotions. 5. Include the sitelinks you think are important. Expand the real estate for your brand and point out the most significant pages on your site – from your perspective. Use location and phone sitelinks so customers know how to find you. 6. Competitors are (or might) be bidding on your brand. Once competitors start bidding on your brand you don’t have a choice. Be there and be on top. 7. Landing page selection. Create a landing page tailored to information you want to promote. An upcoming sale?...

Types of Searches and Paid Search Marketing

Effective paid search marketing starts with understanding why someone is searching. As search marketers our goal is to not only drive traffic to a site, but to drive relevant traffic that generates conversions. Let’s take a look at why people search and how that comes into play when planning your search marketing strategy. In general, there are three main types of search queries. • Navigational query: A searcher knows the site they are looking for and usually has a designated task in mind. For example, you need to check your bank balance online with Wells Fargo but you are uncertain of the exact URL for Wells Fargo. You would search for “wells fargo” or “wellsfargo.com.” Typically, in this type of search there is one correct answer for the searcher. • Transactional query: A searcher wants to make a purchase or complete a specific task. The searcher could be looking for a local hamburger joint, planning to buy their new book club selection, or signing up for a free trial for a new brand of dog food. • Informational query: A searcher is looking for specific information on a topic. This category covers a broad array of searches. Examples are “signs a toddler is teething” or “phases of the moon.” Searches of this type could also be commercial in nature: the information a searcher is looking to start the buying process. For example, “What is the best small digital camera?” is an informational search. The common thread here is that the searcher doesn’t have a specific web site in mind and is looking to gather more information. These searches could...

Google Grants for Nonprofits

Is your organization a non-profit? Did you know that you could be eligible for up to $10,000 a month in free advertising from Google? The Google Grants program was started in 2003 with the mission of helping non-profits increase their reach by providing access to free ads on Google.com and free use of Google products. The Google Grants programs is part a larger program within Google called Google for Nonprofits, which also includes YouTube for Nonprofits, Google Earth Outreach Grants, and Google Apps for Nonprofits. To be eligible to participate in the program, your organization must be a 501(c)(3) and located in the United States. Your site cannot display revenue-generating ads. Overall, the application process is simple. The first step is to be accepted into the Google Grants program by supplying your Employer Identification Number. Once you have submitted your application, it can take up to six weeks to hear back from Google regarding your approval. Once are you accepted into Google for Nonprofits, you are eligible for all products included in the program, including Google Grants, which is the AdWords portion of the program. There are a few differences in how the account should be managed. First, do not add credit card information, although you will be prompted. Second, the upper limit on bids is set at $2 per click. (This limit was recently increased from $1.) You can only run text ads, and ads can only run on Google.com. Lastly, set your daily budget to $330 per day. Obviously, you can only run ads related to your services and programs. Google does require that you actively manage...