Top 7 Takeaways from Video Marketing Webinar

Earlier this June, I joined in on the Content Marketing Institute webinar about online video marketing called Game-Planning Your Online Video Strategy. As someone who works in content marketing, I want to keep current on the latest developments in the video marketing world. Overall, I took away a number of important tips and ideas about video marketing and strategy development. For content marketers who are looking to start the ball rolling on a video strategy, the following are my top 7 takeaways from the CMI video marketing webinar. 1. The webinar interface itself said it all about how to successfully design and implement a webinar user interface whose topic is about online video marketing. I was simply blown away by not onlymackinaw the essentials, like the high quality video and sound clarity, but by the interactivity of it all. Just about all of the webinar interface modules were interactive, allowing the webinar viewer to toggle the size of the video and the webinar slides depending upon their viewing preferences. Furthermore, the CMI webinar interface, developed by KnowledgeVision – whose very own Michael Kolowich was speaking for the webinar – even had a question module in the bottom left corner. Throughout the webinar, if viewers had any pressing questions, they did not have to turn to external social media outlets to ask their questions. They could simply and easily type their question into the question module, beautifully integrated into the webinar platform. The CMI webinar interface even addressed the frequent situation where the webinar speaker references a company or service worth looking up, but quite often does not provide a...

Google Authorship: Changing the Way We View SERPs

With the advent of Google authorship, a Google search engine results page (SERP) has never looked better. As most search engine users know, search engine results pages are text dominant. With Google authorship, content writers can claim credit in SERPs through the inclusion of their image and a credit byline. This simple addition mimics what content consumers are so accustomed to seeing in newspapers and magazine, and creates no small amount of interest in SERPs. As the author of blog posts for the webShine blog, I became interested in how employing Google authorship could potentially impact the reach and visibility of my web articles. In my own search experiences, I have always found myself more drawn, at least initially, to results in a SERP that include relevant images. If I were to search for a cookie recipe, I would probably be more likely to click on the result that includes a cookie image. According to the Google authorship information page, it is fairly easy to begin using the feature. The first step in the whole process is to set up a Google+ profile. Once the Google+ profile is up and running, add a quality profile photo to the page. Google recommends using a head shot. In addition to the profile image, it is important to edit the “Contributor to” section, as this will link your profile page to blogs, news sites, and other web hubs for which you write content. Also, the rest of the Google+ profile should be fairly complete, so that if and when readers of an article decide to check out a Google+ page to view...