Think Content Presentation: A Discussion of Flat Design & Invisible Design

A huge component of the content marketing puzzle is determining how the content is ultimately packaged and presented to the target audience. According to a recent New York Times article written by Nick Bilton, one current graphic design trend involves flat design. The flat design movement is quite possibly most obvious in Microsoft’s unveiling of the Windows 8 interface, which features a layout of vibrantly colored rectangles. Another prime example of flat design is the webShine website itself, wherein we employ neither gradients nor shadows nor any other shading technique. In pondering the gravitation towards flat design, the question arises as to why flat design has become so prevalent. According to Bilton’s article, flat design has been largely influenced by the increasing demand for mobile device design. Not only do flat designs demand less in terms of overall load time, but for content consumption, flat designs establish a clean virtual environment in which to acquire and share information. Therefore, the whole point of flat design in today’s world is to optimize the visual experience by eliminating as many distractions as possible. With flat design, the focus is on delivering the content in a clean and simple package. In fact, flat design might even be equated with invisible design. In the book Just My Type by Simon Garfield, Adrian Frutiger, the revered type designer behind the typeface Frutiger, made an interesting point about the role of design in saying that, “if you remember the shape of your spoon at lunch, it is the wrong shape. The spoon and the letter are tools; one to take food from the bowl, the...