Google Grants for Nonprofits

Is your organization a non-profit? Did you know that you could be eligible for up to $10,000 a month in free advertising from Google? The Google Grants program was started in 2003 with the mission of helping non-profits increase their reach by providing access to free ads on Google.com and free use of Google products. The Google Grants programs is part a larger program within Google called Google for Nonprofits, which also includes YouTube for Nonprofits, Google Earth Outreach Grants, and Google Apps for Nonprofits. To be eligible to participate in the program, your organization must be a 501(c)(3) and located in the United States. Your site cannot display revenue-generating ads. Overall, the application process is simple. The first step is to be accepted into the Google Grants program by supplying your Employer Identification Number. Once you have submitted your application, it can take up to six weeks to hear back from Google regarding your approval. Once are you accepted into Google for Nonprofits, you are eligible for all products included in the program, including Google Grants, which is the AdWords portion of the program. There are a few differences in how the account should be managed. First, do not add credit card information, although you will be prompted. Second, the upper limit on bids is set at $2 per click. (This limit was recently increased from $1.) You can only run text ads, and ads can only run on Google.com. Lastly, set your daily budget to $330 per day. Obviously, you can only run ads related to your services and programs. Google does require that you actively manage...

Analyzing Blog Content: What Does webShine Write About?

Browsing through a blog’s archive is one way to determine what topics are important to a business. After a quick review of webShine’s blog archive, I determined that we like to write about Drupal, SEO, Google, and “search”. However, after plugging in webshine’s blog URL into Wordle, the popular word cloud generator developed by Jonathan Feinberg, the results were, if not considerably more visually appealing, somewhat different from my observations of the blog. Words like algorithm, techniques, and hat appear to be major word choice winners. Though creating word clouds is not a new approach to visualizing frequently used textual content, it always provides a fresh perspective on language. Using web applications like Wordle can also benefit content writers with targeting overused words that might make an article or a blog post sound monotonous. This practice of spotlighting stale and tired words and phrases, and let’s not mistake these words for keywords after all, can guide those who write content for the web towards a more creative approach that is both engaging and entertaining to read....

Questions to Ponder as a Web Content Writer

As a web content writer, one question that is almost always on my mind is, “How many people will actually read this new content?” The speed and frequency with which content in all forms is published on the web is startling. Contemplating the sheer quantity of content that web users are faced with elicits yet another question, “Facing the sometimes overwhelming quantity of web content, how should I modify my content writing strategy to make it more relevant and valuable to readers?” To simplify, “What makes a web content writer successful?” As this is a post about questions to consider as a content marketer and content writer, here is another question I often ask myself, “What makes content good?” The answer to this question is not only a matter of personal taste, but also relies upon industry standards that influence trust. Another way to answer that question is to take the angle of a search engine like Google. Determine what visitors want to read by identifying currently popular content, and using that as a standard from which to create new content. To rephrase that as a question, “What content do readers find useful? What content makes for a valuable read?” Identifying what readers find useful and valuable boils down to an advanced understanding of the audience. Though I do not have satisfying answers for all of my questions, I think the best strategy is to not always leave them unanswered. To answer my opening question, then, about the number of readers who actually read web content, one way to tackle what can be a demoralizing monster is to analyze...