A Web Content Writing Insight: Weave a Narrative, Tell a Story, Get Personal

Learning to write content for the web requires a knack for storytelling, the reason being that the internet is a hub of ultimate distraction. With an intriguing story, a writer can win over an audience. In my recent foray into reading about writing content for the web, the significance of weaving a story into the content stands out. Quite often, in pieces of writing that captured my undivided attention, the writer baited the reader with a carefully phrased introduction, emotional hooks, and personal stories, each of which support the creation of an attention-grabbing narrative. Though, learning to write an intriguing narrative can be difficult. However, the narrative structure is omnipresent, and in its structure lies numerous examples of how to become a better writer and a better storyteller. Writing content for the web is a skill that an individual can acquire simply by paying close attention to everyday encounters with text. If you think about it, each day we come across an abundance of written content, whether it be news stories on the radio, online articles, print newspaper columns, and even a restaurant’s menu. There are limitless opportunities to examine written text, and more specifically, to analyze syntax, review interesting diction, and to study other writing strategies employed by the writer. By paying close attention to the language used in pieces of writing developed for a wide range of audiences, writing attention-grabbing content for the web that tells an interesting story is a task that can be confidently completed. Throughout my research into writing unique content for the web, I will be sure to post the most interesting discoveries...

New to AdWords? Avoid These Mistakes.

One of the great things about Google AdWords is the ability to optimize and tweak nearly every aspect of your campaign. However, for a new user all the bells and whistles are a bit overwhelming. Below are some of the top mistakes new users make when starting their first campaign. 1.) Not understanding the default campaign settings. When you first create a new campaign, you have the option of running ads on “Search & Display Networks”, “Search Network only”, or “Display Network only”. The first option listed in the pull-down is for both the Search & Display Networks. Be careful with your selection here. Spanning a campaign over both networks is not best practice and not ideal. The Search Network includes Google and their search partners. The Display Network consists of content sites that display Google ads alongside their content. There are several options for targeting on the Display network beyond just keywords. Take time to learn more about the targeting options and how to reach the right audience before jumping in. And, when you are ready, start a separate campaign. Bottom line: Create separate campaigns for the Search and the Display Networks. By default Google starts campaigns on “All available devices.” However, you can choose between “Desktop and laptop computers”, “Mobile devices with full browsers” and/or “Tablets with full browsers.” User behavior on mobile devices varies from behavior on laptops and therefore you should create separate campaigns for mobile devices. Include desktop and tablet devices in one campaign and mobile devices in another. If you find over time that behavior on tablets is different, then you want to...